The science of choosing wisely

Tremaine du Preez

Today, making decisions without full information, under short time frames and high levels of stress is the norm rather than the exception. As a professional decision maker, success in both your personal and
professional life depends on the quality of your thinking under these conditions.

Making tough leadership decisions

Similarly, in a world where even small decisions can have enormous consequences, organisational success relies on the cumulative decisions of both leaders and staff. Given how high the stakes are, how much time do you spend specifically developing your thinking skills and those of your team?

In this workshop, behavioural economist Tremaine du Preez, draws on several fields shaping decision science including behavioural economics, social psychology and neuroscience to to introduce you to some foundational skills for making sound decisions under conditions of uncertainty. As an MBA lecturer and global faculty member of Duke Corporate Education, she is known for dressing down serious serious subjects and bringing theory to life and practice.

In this talk you’ll be introduced to the

  • Behavioural stumbling blocks that affect how you process information, formulate opinions and solve problems. You’ll learn how to identify and moderate these influences.
  • The role of unconscious processes such as stress and emotions. These have long been the missing piece in risk analysis, managerial decision making and control processes. Tremaine will explore the origins and impact of specific unconscious processes on risk tolerance and decision making.

A challenging, interesting and practical talk, members will be encouraged to think, question and participate throughout. Ultimately, to rethink their thinking.

Comments from members on this workshop:

  • Loved the practical sessions – really embedded the learning.
  • The speaker delivered in such a way that made me really “think”. She was extremely engaging and delivered in such a way that was easy to digest.
  • She reiterate the key points and required us to participate.
  • Gave me a process to ensure good quality decision making.
  • She worked through a complex subject step by step.
  • Good examples and exercises, very interesting topic.
  • I liked the Muslim bias example.